5 inspirational, REAL rags to wealth stories

Young African family dealing with financial problems. Serious woman sitting in front of open laptop computer and looking through bills while her husband in glasses makes calculations on calculator

2020, a year to be definitely forgotten!

For many they had to endure economic difficulties, among other things. If this applies to you, keep in mind that sometimes it only takes a spark to start a fire that can lead to success.

For this reason. It is important to hear real rags to stories.

They give a sense of optimism that everyone can benefit from. If you need inspiration, read on to learn from people who have turned negative in the fullest sense into positive.

Do won chang

Arrived in America with nothing more than a burning desire to achieve “The American Dream”, Do Won Chang and his wife Jin Sook came to the USA in 1984. Without money and a basic knowledge of English, this would be easy to do. Copy them off. But Do Won’s drive ensured that her life became one of many real rags for riches.

He worked in numerous coffee shops, pumped gasoline and was able to save $ 11,000 as a janitor. They used this to open Fashion 21 in Highland Springs in 1984, what we now know as Forever 21.

The pair are now valued at $ 800 million each.

Ursula Burns

Manhatten’s Lower East Side can be considered an up and coming part of New York, but that hasn’t always been the case. Because of this, Ursula Burns’ rise out of poverty is increasingly admirable.

The mantra instilled in her by her hard-working single mother was “This is where you grow up, but that doesn’t define you”. She lived up to these words, distinguished herself through her education and finally found herself as an intern at Xerox.

She rose through the ranks and became CEO in 2009. She marked many historical landmarks along the way as an African American.

Amancio Ortega

Amancio Ortega is most likely the richest man you’ve never heard of.

His family was badly affected by the Spanish Civil War growing up. At some point, his mother was denied credit by the local grocer, and the shame experienced there drove the young Amancio to ensure his family’s financial security in the future.

He started working at age 14, and the skills he learned from the shorthands served him well when he founded Zara in 1975. This notoriously private and humble businessman is now valued at $ 68.5 billion.

Larry Ellison

Larry Ellison’s life has one of those real rags for telling stories that are more like a Dickens novel than reality.

As an adopted child, he is quoted as saying, “I have had all the disadvantages necessary for success.”

His freestanding adoptive father said he was “good for nothing,” and this appeared to be the case when he dropped out of college twice. He taught himself to program and began a journey that led him to start Oracle.

He currently sits on a net worth of $ 88 billion.

Like others in tech, he had to outsource to achieve this wealth. Using companies like Oly Tech Guys is a great option for any emerging business.

Oprah Winfrey

Oprah’s rise to TV darling and media mogul by the day is all the more impressive when you realize how difficult it was for her to get there.

As a gifted child, after living with her grandmother, she was reunited with her mother in the worst of surroundings at the age of 6. She endured various forms of abuse and poverty, but when she started a humble job at a radio station, she became a cultural giant reportedly worth $ 2.8 billion.

Use real rags to enrich stories today

Which of the real rags to riches stories was your favorite?

As you can see, a lack of opportunity or a troubled background doesn’t guarantee a mediocre life. Hopefully these people can help you on your way to make it big!

Check out our other content to get more motivated in the business world.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Get Free Gift !

Subscribe to our mailing list and get interesting stuff and updates to your email inbox.

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.